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GSR articulated cattle lorry

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jhb171achill
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Really annoys me, Garfield. Nothing I do - including following good advice given here - works. It's actually putting me off posting a lot of stuff.

 

The upside down pics here seem to be "attached images" which only happens for me if I try to upload pics, then it doesn't work, so I stop uploading it. Even if I get the photos up, or don't upload them at all this happens. As John has said these are often upside down or even sideways. Seems to often happen with iPads or iPhones

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I always do that with iPads and iPhones. My desktop one won't do it - not geared up.

 

Anyway - back to writing about Clifden. I was up to 2:30 last night and at it again this morning at 10. Me head's melted. I'll persist tonight, unless someone pings or rings me for a gargle. I'm in the mood for a gargle.

 

Now where was I....

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Seems to be a tractor and draw bar trailer arrangement possibly for un-sealed roads, wonder if they were any built in that format.

 

There are some interesting photos of GSR lorries and busses in Donal Murray's book including a 1934 Leyland 4 ton twin rear axle dropside with removable side extensions and upper livestock deck. The twin rear axle and high ground clearance may have been for use on un-sealed roads

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It looks like it was based on the "Latill" system which had a type of weight transfer so the tractor always had traction. I believe they were popular for work in docks and were used a lot by the meat trades in London and Liverpool. Latill also made a 4 wheel drive version that was very popular as a timber tractor. Off to google Latill now!

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Interesting, Mike. I had another look through Senior's railway papers but I can't find any reference to it at all, though his initials are on the drawing. Amazing to think he was dealing with stuff like that while also working on the "Bredin" coaches, J15 boiler renewal designs, and numerous goods wagons!

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It looks like it was based on the "Latill" system which had a type of weight transfer so the tractor always had traction. I believe they were popular for work in docks and were used a lot by the meat trades in London and Liverpool. Latill also made a 4 wheel drive version that was very popular as a timber tractor. Off to google Latill now!

 

The ESB were users, iirc Latil trucks were imported by Thompsons of Carlow.

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Really annoys me, Garfield. Nothing I do - including following good advice given here - works. It's actually putting me off posting a lot of stuff.

 

two things to try:

1 - Sell iphone/ipad & get an Android phone/tablet

 

or

 

2 - Turn whatever you want to take a photo of upside down!

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The guy in the second photo reminds me of 'Doyle' from The Professionals! CI5 to ESB?

 

Many years ago we had a robbery on a London construction site. The security guard who was not the brightest was approached by two men who introduced themselves as Detective Inspectors Bodie and Doyle, produced Warrant Cards, advised the guard that they were on an undercover operation, and instructed him not to leave his hut or contact control until end of shift.

 

The thieves had a busy and productive night removing ovens, hobs, fridges and washing machines from about 20 completed apartments, not sure if the Met caught up with the perpetrators, but the time and date of the encounter with Bodie and Doyle was recorded in the security guards patrol log book.

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Many years ago we had a robbery on a London construction site. The security guard who was not the brightest was approached by two men who introduced themselves as Detective Inspectors Bodie and Doyle, produced Warrant Cards, advised the guard that they were on an undercover operation, and instructed him not to leave his hut or contact control until end of shift.

 

The thieves had a busy and productive night removing ovens, hobs, fridges and washing machines from about 20 completed apartments, not sure if the Met caught up with the perpetrators, but the time and date of the encounter with Bodie and Doyle was recorded in the security guards patrol log book.

 

Lovely.

 

I've always said that if I ever have twins, they're going to be called Regan and Carter.

 

The chap who played Haskins in The Sweeney was in our local outdoor Shakespeare do one year - unfortunately, it wasn't King Leer, which features the character of the King's daughter, Regan...

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  • 1 month later...

The guy in the second photo reminds me of 'Doyle' from The Professionals! CI5 to ESB?

 

2nd picture taken at ESB office in Enfield which is now closed .

 

5th picture Vauxhall Viva van was used by meter readers ,Supervisors store men and the most unpopular job doing NPA's . NPA's was Non Payment of Accounts where the customer had defaulted on paying their bill . You were sent out to collect the outstading money and if could not be paid then you disconnected the customer .

 

6th picture with VW transporter with the " After Sale Service " was the repair sevice section that the ESB provided for customers who bought appliances from the ESB showrooms that required attention .

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many years ago we had a robbery on a london construction site. The security guard who was not the brightest was approached by two men who introduced themselves as detective inspectors bodie and doyle, produced warrant cards, advised the guard that they were on an undercover operation, and instructed him not to leave his hut or contact control until end of shift.

 

The thieves had a busy and productive night removing ovens, hobs, fridges and washing machines from about 20 completed apartments, not sure if the met caught up with the perpetrators, but the time and date of the encounter with bodie and doyle was recorded in the security guards patrol log book.

 

=))

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