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A sense of anticipation on this sunny evening, as I was en route to the annual RPSI May Tour, in the days when it was known as the "three day tour", not the utterly ghastly title of "international railtour". (No, it's not going to Budapest this year, or any other....)

 

I'm in right cranky mood this morning. Just be that wretched dog barking next door ALL morning.

 

These had BETTER show the right way up, or I will scream very very loudly indeed. You'll hear me, even in New Zealand.

 

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The above was the following morning at Heuston. Steam from the RPSI's 85 on right. We're off to Tralee!

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A final one for today.

 

This was taken in summer 1976. I was at the then-rural (and long closed) Clonsilla station taking photographs. A ballast train appeared and the driver stopped to have a word with the gatekeeper. I ask if I could have a lift; no problem. Health and safety wasn't invented, but neither myself, the driver or the gatekeeper died that day.....

 

So I got a lift to North Wall, where I left the train, took a few photos of shunting and parked old carriages, and hopped over a boundary to the safety of a pavement in Sherriff Street. The signalman there didn't die either.....

 

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A gem of a picture JB. You didn't get the right hand side of the cab by any chance...???

 

The right hand side of the cab would be basically a mirror image of the left hand side, containing most of the controls exactly as they are on the left. The power control wheel would be to the extreme right, and operated with the driver's right hand. There would be no speedometer on the right hand side, and I think the two white coloured vertical gauges above the two dials weren't present either...

Edited by aclass007
spelling.....
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Gotta love that 70's formality

 

Shirt, Tie, Jacket and not a hint of dayglo anywhere.

 

All that's missing is a Twenty Major in his maw.

 

I remember being in the bank and the cashier was smoking, and he offered the customer he was serving a cigarette and a light..... And getting out of a train absolutely kippered. Yecchhh.... went with the territory on ALL public transport..

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It's 1978 in upside-down-land. I'm taking a deep breath before I post these.....!

 

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Breakdown train, Glasnevin Junction, in those idyllic days before anyone going anywhere anything maintenance orientated had to have day-glo underpants, and before so much as a screwdriver had to be sheep-dipped in bright yellow!

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End of an era; the very last MGWR bogie coach, which would have been a good candidate for preservation....

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For modellers; note - grey chassis, not orange. And certainly not Hornby black.... :-)

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One for Garfield...

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.....and for Garfield's great-grandad.... This vehicle was of GSWR origin.

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And the ubiquitous "H" van, hint hint.

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I really don't know what happened there. They are all the right way up. Maybe they turned out as double-upside-down.....

 

Yes, that's it.

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Superb!!!!!

 

Incidentally, for those too youthful to have seen these wagons, you may notice distinct differences between the door of the one in the photo, and flangelubricator's excellent model.

 

Flange's model is grey, as they were initially, thus represents a period before anything was brown. These wagons initially had doors like flange's model; all obviously being correct there - but later on, most had the "smoother" doors, though I certainly saw quite a few still with the type of doors flange has depicted, in the "brown" (1970-7) era. thus, if you want to depict the 60's, use the older type of doors, and grey. Later, brown with either type of doors.

 

Another thing, livery wise, that flange's model reminds me of is the CIE roundel. On "palvans" and "H" vans in GREY, this was in the colours depicted, not all-white. When brown, wagons always had an all-white roundel. Snails would obviously only have been on grey wagons, and white. Snails on tenders of steam engines - lined light green, never yellow or white.

Edited by jhb171achill
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[ATTACH=CONFIG]22939[/ATTACH]

Flangelubricator's model reminds me of the CIE roundel. On "palvans" and "H" vans in GREY, this was in the colours depicted, not all-white

The original grey colour scheme on the cement bubbles also had the orange and white CIE roundel iirc, a very attractive color scheme it is IMO

 

Nice job, Flange, like that a lot

Edited by DiveController
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Another thing I like about this van is the font for the numerals. This is close as can be got to what CIE used. All too often we see little choice available but "Times New Roman" or "Arial". The former was, and is, entirely unknown on Irish railway vehicles. The latter appeared with British Rail's "double arrow blue" era and was never used by CIE either.

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