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jhb171achill
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Here's a lesson in how not to write a notice.

 

Let's start with No. 1.

 

There no need for " marks at the start and end of this notice. In this context, they are wrong.

 

2. Lazy typing. There shouldn't be a gap between the ( bracket and the word "including".

 

3. "It's" servants; are you serious? Wh'y th'e apos'troph'e?

 

4. There is no such word as "whomsoever". Somebody's swallowed a dictionary without having the ability to digest it properly.

 

5. In the second instance of this new word "whomsoever", even if it was a correct word it is entirely superfluous in this context. This is another dictionary indigestion moment: stuff a sentence full of big words you don't understand, let alone understand the correct usage of, in the hope that your notice will sound more "official".

 

6. Lines 3 & 4. When you end a phrase with a comma, you should have a gap between the comma and the next word. Basic typing.

 

7. There should be no comma between "to" and "vehicles" on the third last line.

 

8. "The Board or IT'S servants".... That apostrophe again.

 

9. The CIE heading has no fadas, let alone in the correct place. Perhaps it's just as well; it might translate as "Water Closet & State Cabbage Farm Authority of The Republic of Mozambique"....

 

The whole thing is all the more laughable as it is intended to be a legal, official notice, not something that someone has scrawled on a piece of paper like "back in 5 min". I'd love to see a haughty barrister getting someone off the hook in a court because the notice was written in an unknown language!

 

(Ulster-Scots, perhaps?) :)

 

I despair. Seen in Claremorris, about 2004. Or should I say Claremorri's?

 

Rant over.

 

image.jpg

Edited by jhb171achill
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Gramatically correct, if cumbersome Victorian legalese.....

 

First and last quotation marks are appropriate as it is clear that a document is being quoted, though the ones at the sides are superfluous.

 

Victorian English, it has to be said, tended to be meticulously correct, albeit long winded, formal and dry...

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JB,

 

 

whomsoever (ˌhuːmsəʊˈɛvə )

 

►Definitions

 

pronoun

(archaic ( or formal) the objective form of whosoever ⇒ to whomsoever it may concern

 

 

►Example Sentences Including 'whomsoever'

 

 

 

But my primary loyalty is to my readers --- whomsoever they be --- so that was something I would never do.

Isabel Wolff RESCUING ROSE (2002)

 

In the meantime, whomsoever you take under your protection shall be under my protection and under the shield of Gondor.

J.R.R. Tolkien THE LORD OF THE RINGS (2004)

 

 

Not a rebuke. just information.

 

Kindest regards,

 

David.

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JB,

 

What does the future hold for us? Many businesses, and their employees, no longer appear to give a jot about their standards of workmanship! Telephonic communications are impersonal - hold, press button 1 for XXX, button 2 for YYYY.

 

Maxol, employ a telephonist/receptionist and she has always answered my calls within three rings.

 

I like good service and manners. Perhaps, one day, they may return!

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Here's a lesson in how not to write a notice.

 

Let's start with No. 1.

 

There no need for " marks at the start and end of this notice. In this context, they are wrong.

 

2. Lazy typing. There shouldn't be a gap between the ( bracket and the word "including".

 

3. "It's" servants; are you serious? Wh'y th'e apos'troph'e?

 

4. There is no such word as "whomsoever". Somebody's swallowed a dictionary without having the ability to digest it properly.

 

5. In the second instance of this new word "whomsoever", even if it was a correct word it is entirely superfluous in this context. This is another dictionary indigestion moment: stuff a sentence full of big words you don't understand, let alone understand the correct usage of, in the hope that your notice will sound more "official".

 

6. Lines 3 & 4. When you end a phrase with a comma, you should have a gap between the comma and the next word. Basic typing.

 

7. There should be no comma between "to" and "vehicles" on the third last line.

 

8. "The Board or IT'S servants".... That apostrophe again.

 

9. The CIE heading has no fadas, let alone in the correct place. Perhaps it's just as well; it might translate as "Water Closet & State Cabbage Farm Authority of The Republic of Mozambique"....

 

The whole thing is all the more laughable as it is intended to be a legal, official notice, not something that someone has scrawled on a piece of paper like "back in 5 min". I'd love to see a haughty barrister getting someone off the hook in a court because the notice was written in an unknown language!

 

(Ulster-Scots, perhaps?) :)

 

I despair. Seen in Claremorris, about 2004. Or should I say Claremorri's?

 

Rant over.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]23145[/ATTACH]

 

Legally the Notice was not worth the piece of tin it was printed on ::ROFL:

 

IE would have had a duty under Common Law and h&s legislation to ensure that people who were legally on the railway were not harmed by the actions or inactions of the company or its workers. In other words ensure that the railway was maintained and operated so that it was safe to use rather than trying to hide behind lawyers.

Edited by Mayner
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Legally the Notice was not worth the piece of tin it was printed on ::ROFL:

 

IE would have had a duty under Common Law and h&s legislation to ensure that people who were legally on the railway were not harmed by the actions or inactions of the company or its workers. In other words ensure that the railway was maintained and operated so that it was safe to use rather than trying to hide behind lawyers.

 

The owners of the cars that were damaged when the elements remodelled Kent Station a few years ago would have been compensated for damage caused. Similarly, if a roof tile became dislodged from a station and landed on your head, you don't think you'd be entitled to compensation? Those signs are a bluff.

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The owners of the cars that were damaged when the elements remodelled Kent Station a few years ago would have been compensated for damage caused. Similarly, if a roof tile became dislodged from a station and landed on your head, you don't think you'd be entitled to compensation? Those signs are a bluff.

 

All these notices you see disclaiming responsibility are of course bunkum, but they are placed there in a long established procedure of trying to mitigate any resulting damages

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irtrespassL.jpg

 

Spot the difference?

 

Despite all the use of the Irish language to conform to their obligations, they still manage to get it wrong.

 

I'm sure other signage is probably riddled with errors, though I wouldn't notice, as I'm just about able to ask permission to use the toilet in 'the medium' after the years of schooling in it.

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I used to be able to remember and pronounce this 40 years ago. The 'phonetic' underneath does not sound correct.

 

73135d1202448803-funny-road-signs-llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch_station_sign_-cropped_version_1-.jpg

 

 

Hornby must have had a few spare hours on their hands

 

2011-01-02%2011.59.30_zpscitalhhg.jpg

 

Or as we say in Cabra:

"The church of St. Mary in the hollow of white hazel trees near the rapid whirlpool by St. Tysilio's of the red cave".

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  • 2 weeks later...

While from a cultural point of view, it's a great shame that the Irish language declined so much in the 19th and 20th centuries, and in recent decades has been incorrectly seen by some as a political issue, it bred a generation of "language snobs" who mean well, certainly, but occasionally will sanctimoniously lecture the rest of us about not using it, or using it incorrectly.

 

I knew two folks of this ilk, one with a degree of railway knowledge. He often told me that the Irish used by the CIE group of companies would, in his view, score bottom of the class in any basic school exam, with incorrect grammar and spellings abounding. His view of the Irish used by some other state agencies wasn't much better.

 

Not bring in any position to disagree, I just sagely nodded my head..... Now, I know he meant well. I know that. In an ideal world we'd all speak many languages, and all language evolves. In 1000 years time, it's quite possible that English, Irish and Portuguese - or anything - will be long dead.

 

CIE has variously run trains to Bré and Bri Chullain...... Hmm.

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While from a cultural point of view, it's a great shame that the Irish language declined so much in the 19th and 20th centuries, and in recent decades has been incorrectly seen by some as a political issue, it bred a generation of "language snobs" who mean well, certainly, but occasionally will sanctimoniously lecture the rest of us about not using it, or using it incorrectly.

 

I knew two folks of this ilk, one with a degree of railway knowledge. He often told me that the Irish used by the CIE group of companies would, in his view, score bottom of the class in any basic school exam, with incorrect grammar and spellings abounding. His view of the Irish used by some other state agencies wasn't much better.

 

The sort of people who suggest you are somehow 'less Irish'...whatever that might mean, if you are unable to speak it or simply choose not to speak it doesn't win any popularity contests.

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Correct, minister.

 

As a parallel but separate issue is the fact that it does seem fairly clear that official standards are lacking - or else the public's perception is. Both have one common denominator - the education system. Either teach it correctly and effectively, or give it up....

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