Jump to content

Kingsbridge - workbench

Rate this topic


Noel
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have 7 of the Veda airbrushes, and love them to bits. Somewhere between the badger type and cheap asian ones. Noel, if it's air pressure, are you sure the pressure nut under the nozzle itself is fully opened, and the thumbturn at the end of the airbrush removed? 

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Glenderg said:

I have 7 of the Veda airbrushes, and love them to bits. Somewhere between the badger type and cheap asian ones. Noel, if it's air pressure, are you sure the pressure nut under the nozzle itself is fully opened, and the thumbturn at the end of the airbrush removed? 

Hi Richie. Thanks, Yes to both. :) I have not tried it yet with actual paint since the deep clean, just hand tested the air pressure. My 186 has been flawless up to know and I love it. It has always released slightly less air than other brushes but that was always enough. I normal have the tank at 20-25 psi and the pressure nut fully open. Thanks for the suggestions. Will try paint later. Noel

First step of weathering done. Some wet powders to accentuate doors, hinges, run off water, etc. Water mix with decalfix allows rewetting if need to correct anything. Next step will be a dusting of frame dirt and roof dirt with air brush. Keen systems suspended corridor connectors added.

IMG_4846.thumb.JPG.a312ade033f6b633aade291e787dc325.JPG

Edited by Noel
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The plot thickens.  I was cleaning my Veda 134 earlier and when I put the 0.3mm nozzle back its sheared in half even though I was hand tightening it. I managed to twist the broken half threaded section and get it out of the air brush.  Replaced the entire needle set with a 0.2mm set (i.e. needle, nozzle and nozzle cap) and at least the 134 is now working again but the 186 remains a mystery.  Braking one air brush is unfortunate, two in 24hrs seems careless! :) 

I've loved using these two Veda air brushes over the past 12 months and never had trouble before, but I suspect all my problems stem from a recent change in cleaning pattern.  I never removed the nozzles before when cleaning and used to withdraw the needle rear wards out of the air brush for cleaning.  

Recently I started removing the needle forwards out of the air brush so that any paint on the needle would not be pulled into the innards as per my previous method which never caused a problem anyway.  The way I removed the needle forwards was first to pull it back into the airbrush by about 7mm (so its not under any load in next step), then remove the nozzle cover, unscrew the nozzle using the micro spanner supplied with the brush, and then pull the dirty needle forwards out of the gun. I'm beginning to suspect that the more frequent unscrewing of the nozzle due to its soft material has created air gaps, but I could be wrong. It was difficult to know how much to tighten it when screwing back on.

I beginning to wonder if its time to invest in a higher quality air brush, OR fix what I am doing wrong? :confused:

Edited by Noel
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The old adage of “you get what you pay for” really does apply here.

Lots of people get could results with the cheaper models (myself included) but I got increasingly frustrated with problems with cleaning and paint drying during painting and clogging the brush.  By the way I also have a badger single action brush which give far less trouble.

I ended up getting an Iwata Neo and it was a great investment. Careful cleaning is still essential but I have far less issues.

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, irishthump said:

The old adage of “you get what you pay for” really does apply here.

Lots of people get could results with the cheaper models (myself included) but I got increasingly frustrated with problems with cleaning and paint drying during painting and clogging the brush.  By the way I also have a badger single action brush which give far less trouble.

I ended up getting an Iwata Neo and it was a great investment. Careful cleaning is still essential but I have far less issues.

That's sounds like good advice. The Veda doesn't owe me a whole lot after a whole years use costing me about €35.  It served its purpose as a great starter air brush while I learned before committing to a long term product. Iwata, Badger or H&S will be researched. Presume the neo is dual action, but does it had a trigger limiter? 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Noel,

I bought this airbrush a few years ago: https://www.ebay.ie/itm/Dual-Action-0-2mm-9cc-Needle-Airbrush-Spray-Gun-Air-Brush-For-Model-Paint-Tattoo/301976438859?hash=item464f32c84b:g:IkYAAOSwvg9XVOsg

I think it is very good, dual action with a trigger limiter. I dismantle mine completely when cleaning and it is still working well. The paint flows well and it comes with a few needle sizes.

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Noel, I'd go back to Eoin's post and get some cellulose thinners, strip the thing in it's entirety, put all the parts in a small jar and cover them overnight. Noxious stuff now, that thinners. And when I mean entirety, I mean everything. Just keep the rubber bits aside. 

Just thinking, have you tried just putting water through it, full throttle? Are you getting an even mist? If you release the nut that secures the needle itself at the end of the airbrush, pull it back a touch, does it increase the flow? You may have a bad combo of nozzle, needle, and outer shield. 

Anyway, full disassembly sounds like the next logical route and clean every part and reassemble. 

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Noel said:

That's sounds like good advice. The Veda doesn't owe me a whole lot after a whole years use costing me about €35.  It served its purpose as a great starter air brush while I learned before committing to a long term product. Iwata, Badger or H&S will be researched. Presume the neo is dual action, but does it had a trigger limiter? 

No it doesn't have a trigger limiter, but to be honest that's not really an issue.

  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, RobertRoche said:

Hi Noel,

I bought this airbrush a few years ago: https://www.ebay.ie/itm/Dual-Action-0-2mm-9cc-Needle-Airbrush-Spray-Gun-Air-Brush-For-Model-Paint-Tattoo/301976438859?hash=item464f32c84b:g:IkYAAOSwvg9XVOsg

I think it is very good, dual action with a trigger limiter. I dismantle mine completely when cleaning and it is still working well. The paint flows well and it comes with a few needle sizes.

These generic airbrushes all suffer from the same issue: poor finish due to there low cost.

They look the part but rough internal finishing, coarse screw threads and poorly fitting parts let them down. Like I said they are fine for spraying a general coat of paint but can't cope with finer work. I've relegated mine to spraying coats of auto primer on models. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Glenderg said:

Noel, I'd go back to Eoin's post and get some cellulose thinners, strip the thing in it's entirety, put all the parts in a small jar and cover them overnight. Noxious stuff now, that thinners. And when I mean entirety, I mean everything. Just keep the rubber bits aside. 

Just thinking, have you tried just putting water through it, full throttle? Are you getting an even mist? If you release the nut that secures the needle itself at the end of the airbrush, pull it back a touch, does it increase the flow? You may have a bad combo of nozzle, needle, and outer shield. 

Anyway, full disassembly sounds like the next logical route and clean every part and reassemble. 

Thanks Richie.  Its been through the ultrasonic bath which can shift even time! :)  I think I've kybashed it myself by removing the nozzle too many times recently.  Up to a month ago I never removed the nozzle from either airbrush and never had a problem.  

21 minutes ago, irishthump said:

. . .rough internal finishing, coarse screw threads and poorly fitting parts let them down. 

I think this is the problem combined with my hands. Its my own fault, I should have stuck to my previous cleaning regime as it always worked.  I recently changed my pattern after watching a few YouTubes on cleaning which suggested removing the needle out through the front of the airbrush instead of rear ward so that you wouldn't pull paint back up into inside of the brush, but this obviously requires the nozzle to be unscrewed.  Clearly the threads and O rings didn't like this man handling by me.  With hindsight it wasn't necessary to disassemble as much as I was doing for deep cleans.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Noel said:

Thanks Richie.  Its been through the ultrasonic bath which can shift even time! :)  I think I've kybashed it myself by removing the nozzle too many times recently.  Up to a month ago I never removed the nozzle from either airbrush and never had a problem.  

I think this is the problem combined with my hands. Its my own fault, I should have stuck to my previous cleaning regime as it always worked.  I recently changed my pattern after watching a few YouTubes on cleaning which suggested removing the needle out through the front of the airbrush instead of rear ward so that you wouldn't pull paint back up into inside of the brush, but this obviously requires the nozzle to be unscrewed.  Clearly the threads and O rings didn't like this man handling by me.  With hindsight it wasn't necessary to disassemble as much as I was doing for deep cleans.

That little spanner they include with the airbrush should carry a health warning! You may need to use it to remove the spray tip, but nothing more than finger pressure should be enough to secure it. The threads are too easily stripped regardless of the quality of the brush.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 15/03/2018 at 5:04 PM, Noel said:

The plot thickens.  I was cleaning my Veda 134 earlier and when I put the 0.3mm nozzle back its sheared in half even though I was hand tightening it. I managed to twist the broken half threaded section and get it out of the air brush.  Replaced the entire needle set with a 0.2mm set (i.e. needle, nozzle and nozzle cap) and at least the 134 is now working again but the 186 remains a mystery. 

Hi Noel

I reckon the ultrasonic cleaner has caused this problem- it is known that ultrasonic cleaners can cause metal fatigue by vibrating the crystals to the point of destruction- the glue in the metal lets the hard particles go and under pressure or working the item breaks. I would recommend keeping precision tools and metal models (especially ones that have been super-glued or epoxied) away from ultrasonics.....

Eoin

Edited by murrayec
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yehaw!  Veda 186 airbrush is back in operation and working perfectly again! hyper.gif

You never stop learning.  Thanks to Richie, Irishtump and Eoin for your advice.  A combination of all eventually worked.  I was flummoxed and about to give up but then thought I'd nothing to loose so had one last try.  I striped everything of the body and gave it on its own another ultrasonic bath, but this time for a long 6 minutes.  Then I soaked it for two hours in surgical spirits. 

Put it back together again and this time I could tell immediately that there was more air pressure and when tested with water a lovely fine mist come out of it.  So next was to try it with real paint which worked a dream.  I very lightly weathered two CIE craven coaches. Mainly under frames, bogies, coach ends and a little on the roof.

Thank you guys!  There's always something new to learn.

IMG_5098.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Informative 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

43 minutes ago, irishthump said:

One thing about surgical spirits/isopropyl alcohol. I’ve noticed that it can cause a funny reaction with certain brands of acrylic paints where the paint clumps and clogs the brush like bejeezus.

Thanks good info, yes I'm aware of that. Gave the brush a good bath with soapy water afterwards and then ran water through it for a good while. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, murrayec said:

I have to agree there with thumper- surgical spirits is not the best for cleaning paint, paint doesn't dilute in it like it does in thinners, spirit can also melt O rings and plastics that some guns have.....

Eoin

It’s odd, I’ve read a lot of articles in Model Railroader where they describe thinning their acrylic paints with alcohol. Obviously their popular brands don’t give them trouble but I find that Vallejo and Games Workshop acrylics turn to a gritty sludge...

Edited by irishthump
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, murrayec said:

Hi irishthump

There are different grades of alcohol spirit, I suspect them Americans use a specific grade for mixing paint? I have a bottle of isoprop from a pharmacy that melts any soft plastic or rubber it comes in contact with, skin also!.....

Eoin

I have some 90% iso which is the same stuff they mention in MR.

It doesn’t damage plastic but will strip acrylic paint from models if you soak them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CIE Brake Parcel Van finished at last. Converted from a Bachmann LMS parcel van. Lightly weathered using a mix of weathering powders and airbrush. I've enjoyed doodling with this little project. :) 

IMG_5169.jpg

I'm reasonably happy the way the light weathering turned out.

IMG_5167.jpg

Woodvale Junction station pilot about to shunt CIE brake parcel van onto rake of laminate coaches.

IMG_5170.jpg

Bachmann donor before and after conversion

IMG_5190.jpg

Edited by Noel
corrected photo error
  • Like 5
  • WOW! 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

Nice job!

Thanks Jonathan. ''Twas your advice last year that gave me the idea of doing a brake parcel. 

1 hour ago, PaulC said:

Doodling?  What would you be capable of if you really put your mind to it?! ;)

Cheers Paul. The main thing was it was enjoyable. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, popeye said:

That's a beautiful job Noel.

Great weathering. =D

Thanks Popeye. Encouragement from a skilled maestro such as yourself is humbling. The cutting and filling was scary but took it slow. CIE Brake Parcel van made it debut on the layout this evening. Its play time. :) 

IMG_5184.jpg

Edited by Noel
typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 18/03/2018 at 4:53 PM, Noel said:

CIE Brake Parcel Van finished at last. Converted from a Bachmann LMS parcel van. Lightly weathered using a mix of weathering powders and airbrush. I've enjoyed doodling with this little project. :) 

IMG_5169.jpg

I'm reasonably happy the way the light weathering turned out.

IMG_5167.jpg

Woodvale Junction station pilot about to shunt CIE brake parcel van onto rake of laminate coaches.

IMG_5170.jpg

Bachmann donor before and after conversion

IMG_5190.jpg

Lining looks spot on Noel very crisp, lovely finish too with the weathering =D 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Back doodling with the pair pseudo ex-GSWR ballast ploughs converted from 1972 Tri-ang GWR brake vans.  Jeepers these old plastic models were rough mouldings in their day, with loads of flash and mould line ridges that had to be filed and sanded down. Dog rough but then again they were designed to be thrown out of cots! :) 

Got the windows cut out and framed, removed the industrial revolution sized brass coupling rivets, got the massive metal tri-ang tension lock coupling removed and all the surplus plastic from the chassis including brake gear. Just fitted a NEM pocket that will take a Bachmann tension lock or a Kadee no 19, which is seen here test fitted with the kadee coupling gauge. Had to decide what size wheel i'd fit before aligning the NEM pocket for ride height.

First coat of primer on the body, a few spots of filler needed. The chassis were made out of a very soft bendable plastic - cot proof I guess. Before going much further need to figure out how I'm going to fit the oil lamps and a flickering stove light. Chimneys to be moved and stanchions added to the veranda.  Think I'm crazy trying to recycle this pair but its fun doodling occasionally with them.

IMG_5321.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, David Holman said:

One of those projects that might have been quicker and easier to scratch build, but if it is enjoyable, then why not?

Looking good too!

Hi David. Yes that dawned on me too just after I started out, but I am just enjoying the doodling while recycling these old toys from 1970.  It's been fun cutting them up with little risk if it goes wrong as they were ancient and rather crude Tri-ang hornby wagons. Noel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Those are looking great!

Not sure when they started painting them yellow, but probably after they covered them in steel sheet.  In this guise, either a slightly darker grey all over (inc. chassis obviously), or brown all over.....

The DCDR one, as most will know, is completely incorrect in its livery. GSWR markings, but CIE brown on sides; and black chassis - a mix of the unmixable, and the never-used! SSM have suitable snails or roundels.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use