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20170618_212652.jpg The Irish Railway Models ballast wagons finally arrived to this part of the world this week and we're put into service masquadering as dolomite wagons. The models are just fantastic, I cant add anything to the justified praise which they have received. Dolomite deposits exist near Rathmore on the Tralee line and in my alternative history it was shipped to Ballinacoutry over the South Waterford line. Future plans are to build a couple of older style plough vans appropriate for my 1973-74 era. Ballast was loaded at Carroll Cross at various times which would justify frequent ballast trains on the layout.

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Patrick, very nice indeed. I can tell that you are pleased with your work and I can only say that having achieved what you have done, you can now continue to add more detail on the platform to bring it all to life. Some railway staff and passengers give any layout life. Well done.

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Fabulous layout photo scenes as ever Patrick.

 

. . . masquerading as dolomite wagons. . . . Dolomite deposits exist near Rathmore on the Tralee line and in my alternative history it was shipped to Ballinacoutry over the South Waterford line. Future plans are to build a couple of older style plough vans appropriate for my 1973-74 era.

 

Great idea. Goods traffic rather than solely PW ballast use. I plan to do the same with older style plough van (i.e. brown/bauxite colour). I don't do yellow - far too modern looking for my personal taste! :)

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Now all that's needed is a mixed rake of oil and magnesite wagons to complete the railway scene.

It occurs to me that it's possible to use the mineral wagons as ballast wagons as well by just modify the lettering on one side.

 

Stephen

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Looking good Patrick, I like the crane is it scratch built?

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It's made with Plastistruct components. The dimensions were guesstimated from photos in Rails Through North Kerry and a photo on Eirtrains from Navan. I know of three similar cranes which were on the system at Tralee Rathkeale and Navan. Does anyone know of any more? The model is really just an approximation of the prototype, I am reluctant to put too much effort into a model when all I have to work with is a few photos and have absolutly no demensions but it does look the part. In reply to Steve's post regarding the ballast hoppers, I too am considering altering the lettering on one side to use them as dolomite hoppers since they are viewed from only one side on the layout anyway. I may simply cover the PWD lettering with a small piece of brown decal paper which could be easily removed at a future date with decal setting solution to return the wagons to their original lettering. The axel boxes are wrong and of course the numbers but these are compromises I can live with on a layout designed for operation.

Edited by patrick

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Thinking a bit more about the latest photos, you've had to apply a degree of selective compression with your dolomite train, which isn't such a problem with your average pick-up goods. The consist of 12 hoppers looks fine compared to the real dolomite train at 1:55 on this clip which has 24 hoppers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okOsw4W0CbA.

 

I think your problem will be with the oil and magnesite trains, which seemed to come in the three variations possible. You'll have to decide whether a train with 2/3 oil wagons and 9/10 hoppers looks the part, or whether you should run separate oil and magnesite trains. Irish Freight Models do a passable magnesite wagon, if you accept the incorrect chassis and body proportions. The latter is easily cured with a razor saw and a good eye.

 

Stephen

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It's made with Plastistruct components. The dimensions were guesstimated from photos in Rails Through North Kerry and a photo on Eirtrains from Navan. I know of three similar cranes which were on the system at Tralee Rathkeale and Navan. Does anyone know of any more?

 

There were also similar cranes at Heuston and Dromod, and another at the wagon servicing facility in North Wall, which is still still in use.

 

Those are the ones I can think of off the top of my head... I'm sure there are more.

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Thinking a bit more about the latest photos, you've had to apply a degree of selective compression with your dolomite train, which isn't such a problem with your average pick-up goods. The consist of 12 hoppers looks fine compared to the real dolomite train at 1:55 on this clip which has 24 hoppers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okOsw4W0CbA.

 

I think your problem will be with the oil and magnesite trains, which seemed to come in the three variations possible. You'll have to decide whether a train with 2/3 oil wagons and 9/10 hoppers looks the part, or whether you should run separate oil and magnesite trains. Irish Freight Models do a passable magnesite wagon, if you accept the incorrect chassis and body proportions. The latter is easily cured with a razor saw and a good eye.

 

Stephen

 

Train length was a major consideration when designing the layout. A secondary main line theme was chosen because 4 coach passenger trains would not be out of place and that became the maximum train length. Remember trains have to fit into two staging yards and two passing loops so for every additional unit a train is increased by four units are lost from the main line. A long run between stations was desireable as I like to see trains run through open country as much as shunting. When the layout was extended on the West (Cork) end, the Cork staging yard ended up much longer. This was not intentional but as a result of having to fit the yard throat around a curve and this was the only way I could get it to work without building custom pointwork. At present train length is limited by Waterfor staging yard and Grange passing loop which have a capacity of a locomotive and 11 20 foot wagons or 4 coaches. Longer trains are run but this involves some fiddLing at Waterford staging yard or in the case of loose coupled goods trains, ensuring that they arrive at Waterford with less than 12 wagons and a brake van. On the list of things to do is to install curved points in Waterford staging yard to gain a few inches in train length. Regarding the dolomite train, 12 wagons are visually too few for a pair of GM's. The photos were staged to suggest how the prototype was run. An A class will be employed during regular operating sessions.

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There were also similar cranes at Heuston and Dromod, and another at the wagon servicing facility in North Wall, which is still still in use.

 

Those are the ones I can think of off the top of my head... I'm sure there are more.

 

Thanks Garfield. The Rathkeale one was installed in the late 60's. Presumably they all date from this period. I'm surprised to hear there is one still in use at North Wall.

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Thinking a bit more about the latest photos, you've had to apply a degree of selective compression with your dolomite train, which isn't such a problem with your average pick-up goods. The consist of 12 hoppers looks fine compared to the real dolomite train at 1:55 on this clip which has 24 hoppers

 

 

Fabulous film clip. Thanks for posting. So what changes would one need to make to IRM Ballast train to pass it off as 'Dolomite' train?

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Thanks Garfield. The Rathkeale one was installed in the late 60's. Presumably they all date from this period. I'm surprised to hear there is one still in use at North Wall.

 

No problem, Patrick!

 

The one at North Wall is located at the wagon servicing facility and is used to raise wagons so that axles can be removed and replaced.

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Thinking a bit more about the latest photos, you've had to apply a degree of selective compression with your dolomite train, which isn't such a problem with your average pick-up goods. The consist of 12 hoppers looks fine compared to the real dolomite train at 1:55 on this clip which has 24 hoppers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okOsw4W0CbA.

 

I think your problem will be with the oil and magnesite trains, which seemed to come in the three variations possible. You'll have to decide whether a train with 2/3 oil wagons and 9/10 hoppers looks the part, or whether you should run separate oil and magnesite trains. Irish Freight Models do a passable magnesite wagon, if you accept the incorrect chassis and body proportions. The latter is easily cured with a razor saw and a good eye.

 

Stephen

 

I seem to remember counting rakes of 19 dolomite wagons back in the day... So, I assume rakes of less than 20 weren't unusual. 18 hopper wagons should make an acceptable length model.

 

An A class hauling a short rake of 8 or 9 oil tank wagons was a very regular movement on the branch, which would be very easily modelled. I think oil trains consisting of 24 wagons were brought from Tivolli to Waterford at times when consumption of oil increased at the plant. These trains were split in Waterford and brought out to Ballinacourty in the short rakes.

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Train length was a major consideration when designing the layout. A secondary main line theme was chosen because 4 coach passenger trains would not be out of place and that became the maximum train length. Remember trains have to fit into two staging yards and two passing loops so for every additional unit a train is increased by four units are lost from the main line. A long run between stations was desireable as I like to see trains run through open country as much as shunting. When the layout was extended on the West (Cork) end, the Cork staging yard ended up much longer. This was not intentional but as a result of having to fit the yard throat around a curve and this was the only way I could get it to work without building custom pointwork. At present train length is limited by Waterfor staging yard and Grange passing loop which have a capacity of a locomotive and 11 20 foot wagons or 4 coaches. Longer trains are run but this involves some fiddLing at Waterford staging yard or in the case of loose coupled goods trains, ensuring that they arrive at Waterford with less than 12 wagons and a brake van. On the list of things to do is to install curved points in Waterford staging yard to gain a few inches in train length. Regarding the dolomite train, 12 wagons are visually too few for a pair of GM's. The photos were staged to suggest how the prototype was run. An A class will be employed during regular operating sessions.

 

A class locos were used on the dolomite trains in the early days of the operation. However, they had problems restarting when they stopped at the crew operated level crossing gates located on the new spur into the factory, so the dolomite traffic became a double headed GM working. So, an A class with a livery from the early 70's would be perfectly suitable.

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Once again, some lovely shots of the railway going about its business. As has been said before, this layout is worthy of appearing in the model railway press. Living where you do, does Model Railroader ever feature non American layouts?

 

Stephen

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Love the PalVan! How was that made?

See how well authentic CIE wagons look on a layout! The H van adds to this too. (Leslie, I want commission!!) 😉

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I'm dreaming I've died and gone to heaven :) I will never tire of looking at photos of your fabulous layout.  The era is just so 1972-1974. Two axle pickup goods traffic heaven.

Love it. :tumbsup:

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My previous post is a series of pictures following a typical operating session on the layout. We imagine the action taking place during daylight hours in early October at the start of the beet season. The second photo, which is out of sequence, shows the Cork fiddle yard at the start of the session. The empty beet train takes the loop at Grange to wait for the Waterford Cork Bell liner and once that is clear swaps an empty beet wagon for a loaded one before continuing to Glen More, passing loaded wagons at Keilys Cross which will be picked up on the return trip. Meanwhile the Waterford Cork goods takes the main line at Glen More to wait the arrival of the beet special. To be continued...........

Edited by patrick

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Utterly sublime Partick.  You've made my day. A superb model version of scenes from JBs book 'Rails Through the West'. 

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I've said this before but I'll say it again, I love how the layout is surroundinged by black coverings, really makes the layout pop out and become the centre of attention. 

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The Cork goods proceeds to Grange where it takes the loop and waits for the Waterfprd passenger train. Meanwhile the beet special swaps four emptys for four loads, runs around its train and waits for the Waterford passenger train before departing for Cork.

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