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CIE Palvan

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StevieB
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The final development of the 4w van was the Palvan, which looked very similar to the BR van of the same name. Now my question for the experts out there is did they mounted on a 10' wheelbase, as the H van, or were they mounted on the 12' wheelbase being introduced at the time? The recently introduced IFM model uses the latter but, compared with photos of the prototype, they look stretched!

Many thanks.

Stephen

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No idea Stephen, but Slaters do a nice 7mm scale version. The notes say they were short lived, mainly as they needed access to both sides. One would hope a 4mm version might be available somewhere.

 

Parkside do a 4mm kit. So easy to build that I even managed it! Mine is being kept in UK spec though...

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Looking again at the photos on the IFM website, the model is numbered 27150, maybe a subsequent batch which was longer.

Stephen

 

Even stranger! While 27150 did have a 12' 0" wheelbase, this series of wagons (27101 - 27300) were 4-wheel flat wagons dating from 1970.

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As has already been mentioned, Parkside Dundas produce a kit of the BR Palvan (listed for sale at £9.00 + P&P on their website), which along with some styrene sheet and a bit of hewing with a craft knife, will produce a more accurate model of the CIÉ pallet van for less money.

 

http://www.parksidedundas.co.uk/acatalog/copy_of_BRITISH_RAILWAYS.html

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As has already been mentioned, Parkside Dundas produce a kit of the BR Palvan (listed for sale at £9.00 + P&P on their website), which along with some styrene sheet and a bit of hewing with a craft knife, will produce a more accurate model of the CIÉ pallet van for less money.

 

http://www.parksidedundas.co.uk/acatalog/copy_of_BRITISH_RAILWAYS.html

 

And here is an idiots guide on how to build one http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/showthread.php/2474-Warbonnet-s-Workbench-Windowsill

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Nice one Fran

 

Nothing wrong with those modelling skills, when I saw that post first I bought a few of the kits, stored for a DARTless day of making!

 

What exactly needs to be done with plastic card and a craft knife to make this kit Irish?

 

murrayec

 

The main visual difference is that the CIE wagons had sliding doors and the brake gear is simpler than BR. The sliding door and runners are easiest to sort out with some plasticard and micro-strip.

 

Its worth while checking out Brian Flannigan's Fliker site Pallet Van + Open Wagon there seems to have been a lot of variety in door and end detail between individual vans. The Pressed Steel Company may have been clearing out its stock of end pressings after BR finished building the last of its traditional vans.

 

http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/entry.php/57-Simple-21mm-stock-conversions

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Yes, the height difference made goods trains look very un-uniform, especially when corrugated opens, the odd wooden open wagon, and the odd wooden van of GNR or GSR origin was thrown in. Add to that the box shape of a modern 20ft container on a 4w flat wagon, or a couple of bubbles.....

 

And this is before fertiliser bogies appear!

 

Then add in the ingredient of some brown, some grey!

Edited by jhb171achill
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I think they were more a stop gap measure to handle pallets which were becoming a more popular way of transporting goods by the mid 1960's, interestingly enough.BR introduced their.palvans in the mid fifties and started withdrawal in the mid sixties , CIE began building their palvans in 1964/65 and they would all be gone by the late 1970's in favour of unit loads .

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The GNR equivalent of the CIE "H" van is very similar to vans built at the same time (1954) by British Railways, and a straight repaint is a good equivalent. Don't forget an "N" after the wagon number though, when in CIE livery.

 

The pallet van has more differences, but easy to alter, as demonstrated well here by others.

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All was grey, junctionmad, until about 1969/70, when increasing number of wagons were being "fitted". Had goods wagons been frequently repainted, the grey would have vanished quickly, as all-brown became the standard for all goods wagons, fitted or not. But compared with carriages they rarely saw a paint brush. I photographed a standard H van in Ballina in grey - but not only that, still with a (obviously pre-1962) "flying snail" on it, as late as 1977. So it hadn't been painted for 15 years.

 

By the time loose coupled trains ended, and thus all the old 4 wheel goods vans were set aside, at least a third of everyday goods stock was still grey. While most had CIE "roundels", even the the occasional one still had a "snail" to the end.

 

Needless to say, nothing brown ever had a snail, as the brown appeared long after the roundel had dos placed the snail.

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All was grey, junctionmad, until about 1969/70, when increasing number of wagons were being "fitted". Had goods wagons been frequently repainted, the grey would have vanished quickly, as all-brown became the standard for all goods wagons, fitted or not. But compared with carriages they rarely saw a paint brush. I photographed a standard H van in Ballina in grey - but not only that, still with a (obviously pre-1962) "flying snail" on it, as late as 1977. So it hadn't been painted for 15 years.

 

By the time loose coupled trains ended, and thus all the old 4 wheel goods vans were set aside, at least a third of everyday goods stock was still grey. While most had CIE "roundels", even the the occasional one still had a "snail" to the end.

 

Needless to say, nothing brown ever had a snail, as the brown appeared long after the roundel had dos placed the snail.

 

 

Thanks, my memories when I was photographing signals in the late 70s , was of mostly brown vehicles lain up in sidings everywhere. I never had a great interest in historical rolling stock per sae , its only now , revisiting parts of the network with the advantage of near limitless digital photography, that I nearly cry at all the missed photo opportunities I passed up

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I'm the same. I didn't travel as much as a few travellers here, or modern photographers like Chris P or the Wanderer, or Finnyus. However I did manage to get to some interesting places by train.

 

However, it also has to be said that all forms of travel are proportionally cheaper now, services on almost all lines are more frequent than before, and what obscure railway locations there were in the past are gone. So, today, it's easier to chronicle what's left.

 

That said, like you I know I could have photographed so, so much more.

 

The familiar often remains untouched by photographers, past and present alike...

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