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Cie diesel shunter

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They were delivered like that, all of them, but repainted in Black and Tan at first repaint. They therefore only bore that livery a very short time; I think the last to be repainted was about 1967/8.

 

Originally, as you can see, they didn't have side handrails either.

 

The wagon is a standard pattern GSR one of 1930/40's origin. A few remained in traffic until the large number of "H" vans were all in traffic. Therefore, that picture is taken between 1962 and maybe 1966.

 

In Ireland they were used as main line locos, not shunters; in latter years often running in pairs with each other or members of the 141 or 181 classes. 124 and 134 are preserved.

Edited by jhb171achill
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From Eiretrains - http://eiretrains.com/Photo_Gallery/Irish%20Locomotives/121%20Class/slides/132_19610608_001_CC_JA.jpg .

 

132_19610608_001_CC_JA.jpg

 

"On the 8th June 1961, loco No.B132 reached Ballaghaderreen Station with a special from Kilfree Junction, a branchline which had remained the haunt of steam motive power until closure in February 1963. ©J.E.Aitken"

 

Plenty of other pictures on there in this livery.

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I have seen the original operators manual for this loco which was dated February 1962. On the front cover and in the book it shows pictures of the loco with the handrails installed. Do you know if the hand handrails were delivered with the locos and never installed?

Edited by krose
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Noel, was this formerly a BR / USA, looks big enough for USA, what's the story as to where it came from, is there any similar BR / USA shunters around, thanks in advance,

 

They ran here for over 50 years. 121s were the first locos built by GM for Ireland and this was the livery they were delivered in. They soon went into black and tan livery. They were mainline engines, not shunters.

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I'm not sure if handrails were actually delivered with them or not, but they certainly didn't have them until after repainting; numerous photos exist of them in BnT but no handrails!

 

This could be due to the initial idea that they would operate nose first, but contradicting that idea is the fact that they started operating cab first long before handrails were fitted....

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They must truly have looked strange to enthusiasts of the day!

I think they looked great in this livery, not sure how well that might have weathered though! Shows the snail to great effect on the bonnet.

 

I think it not just the single cab which makes it look a little odd (at least to our minds, having seen the double cabbed GMs for so long) but also the height of he cab which looks a little awkward even now. Obviously it was this tall to allow it to run bonnet first.

I think this is taller than the coaches it pulls. I wonder if the US loading gauge is taller in general the in Ireland. Any US outline enthusiasts?

Edited by DiveController
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Noel, was this formerly a BR / USA, looks big enough for USA, what's the story as to where it came from, is there any similar BR / USA shunters around, thanks in advance,

 

The B121s were a General Motors export design with nothing similar running in the BR or in the USA.

 

B121 is on Murphy Models wish list, the Model Irish Railways whitemetal or resin version may pop up from time to time on the second hand market

 

The Irish locos were a customised version of the General Motors GL8 export design developed in the early 1960s mainly for use in Australia, Asia, Mexico & South America. GM developed the GL design to break Alco & General Electric (USA) domination of the South American, Asian and Australian export markets.

 

The B121 were closest mechanically & electrically and did similar work to the Victoria Railways Class T which also ran on the Irish 5'3" gauge, but the Australian and Irish locos were quite different visually. http://www.ask.com/wiki/Victorian_Railways_T_class_(diesel)?o=2802&qsrc=999&ad=doubleDown&an=apn&ap=ask.com The T Class was a road switcher design with a short hood rather than an end cabbed design like the B121s.

 

The Mexican and South American locos built for narrow 3' & 5'6" broad gauge, were visually similar to the CIE locos but tended to have lower cabs and different door arrangement.

 

The Mexican locos were only intended for low speed work, had simpler electrics and ran on American freight car bogies or trucks.

 

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=1566079

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Imagine sitting, ( hypothetically speaking of course ) in the centre of the track with that thing comes hurtling out of the night, even the sight of it would scare the U NO WHAT outa ya,

Why hypothetically or otherwise would you be sitting in the middle of a track at night unless you'd fallen over the first rail on the way from the pub:cheers:

and thankfully landed on a track without a third rail=))

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Any idea if this US loco is in any way related to them?

I pass these most days (short-cutting) my way to work. They're frequently shunting oils or hoppers usually singly or occasionally in consists bonnet to bonnet. BNSF owns the track but other than a passing resemblance to the the 121s (they're on rails with a single cab!) I've no idea if they're even a GM. Pardon my ignorance on US outline, hence they question….

IMG_0954_2.jpg

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From Eiretrains - http://eiretrains.com/Photo_Gallery/Irish%20Locomotives/121%20Class/slides/132_19610608_001_CC_JA.jpg .

 

132_19610608_001_CC_JA.jpg

 

"On the 8th June 1961, loco No.B132 reached Ballaghaderreen Station with a special from Kilfree Junction, a branchline which had remained the haunt of steam motive power until closure in February 1963. ©J.E.Aitken"

 

Plenty of other pictures on there in this livery.

 

Posted elsewhere a couple of photies of 121 in original liveries on Ballybeg...

 

http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/showthread.php/109-Ballybeg/page2

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I think they looked great in this livery, not sure well that might have weathered though! Shows the snail to great effect on the bonnet.

 

I think it not just the single cab which makes it look a little odd (at least to our minds, having seen the double cabbed GMs for so long) but also the height of he cab which looks a little awkward even now. Obviously it was this tall to allow it to run bonnet first.

I think this is taller than the coaches it pulls. I wonder if the US loading gauge is taller in general the in Ireland. Any US outline enthusiasts?

 

Yes the US loading gauge is much bigger than ours.

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P

The B121s were a General Motors export design with nothing similar running in the BR or in the USA.

 

B121 is on Murphy Models wish list, the Model Irish Railways whitemetal or resin version may pop up from time to time on the second hand market

 

The Irish locos were a customised version of the General Motors GL8 export design developed in the early 1960s mainly for use in Australia, Asia, Mexico & South America. GM developed the GL design to break Alco & General Electric (USA) domination of the South American, Asian and Australian export markets.

 

The B121 were closest mechanically & electrically and did similar work to the Victoria Railways Class T which also ran on the Irish 5'3" gauge, but the Australian and Irish locos were quite different visually. http://www.ask.com/wiki/Victorian_Railways_T_class_(diesel)?o=2802&qsrc=999&ad=doubleDown&an=apn&ap=ask.com The T Class was a road switcher design with a short hood rather than an end cabbed design like the B121s.

 

The Mexican and South American locos built for narrow 3' & 5'6" broad gauge, were visually similar to the CIE locos but tended to have lower cabs and different door arrangement.

 

The Mexican locos were only intended for low speed work, had simpler electrics and ran on American freight car bogies or trucks.

 

http://www.rrpicturearchives.net/showPicture.aspx?id=1566079

 

Mayer, many thanks for that very informative explanation, & maybe MM will come good

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. . . maybe MM will come good

 

Hmmm, hopefully MM might produce an A '001' class model before a 121. I'd be happy with either, but 'A' models should fly off the shelves as well as costing less to produce than 121s, due to less intricate parts requiring less manual labour during assembly (e.g. one piece body, no hand rails, integrated cab ends). How we consumers dream with no comprehension of model manufacturing economics! :)

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Hmmm, hopefully MM might produce an A '001' class model before a 121. I'd be happy with either, but 'A' models should fly off the shelves as well as costing less to produce than 121s, due to less intricate parts requiring less manual labour during assembly (e.g. one piece body, no hand rails, integrated cab ends). How we consumers dream with no comprehension of model manufacturing economics! :)

 

Noel, you're already getting my hope's up :cheers:

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Hmmm, hopefully MM might produce an A '001' class model before a 121. I'd be happy with either, but 'A' models should fly off the shelves as well as costing less to produce than 121s, due to less intricate parts requiring less manual labour during assembly (e.g. one piece body, no hand rails, integrated cab ends). How we consumers dream with no comprehension of model manufacturing economics! :)

 

121 is next in line for PM.

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No hurry, very happy to wait another 4 or 5 years. Have enough for now. Need to spend more time on construction than running anyway! :)

 

Speak for your bleedin' self!:)

 

:) Life thought me the hard way to be patient and learn how to be 'content'.

 

What will be will be, and what won't won't.

 

hamlet-slogan.jpg

 

And I don't even smoke.

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Speak for your bleedin' self!:)

Yes, sorry, but I'm with Irishthump on this. Life's way too short for that but until we have alternatives… which we don't.

 

I'd love to see a RTR J15. I'll sell me house and buy 111 of them!

You have ZERO chance of EVER seeing this produced by MM. At 4-5 years per model he'll have long retired by the time you get to the J15. If you can get 189 others interested you could do a limited run of 300 yourself:D

Edited by DiveController
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Like Noel said, if something's that good, then it's worth waiting for, so what's another year or 3 or 4, I'll wait

Wait away, Paul. :praying: We don't seem to have (m)any other options right now. MM models might never even put out an A class. The only thing that PM has 'committed to' right now is the 121 and that won't happen until enough capital investment has been recouped form all of the stock out there still on the shelves. To boot, there has been a lot of concern and discussion regarding the Supertrain liveried MK2ds which might not fly off the shelves as had been stated prior to release. tic-toc……….:facepalm:

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