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Irish Shell & BP

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I came across this photo of the small shunter which worked the Irish Shell & BP depot on the North Wall in Dublin. The loco has two axles and an extremely short wheelbase, but apart from that I have no further details (builders, engine type etc). Does anyone know more about this locomotive and what became of it? I think that the photo was taken in the late 60s or early 70s at a time when one could wander down the North Wall on a Sunday with a camera and not be bothered by port security concerns.

Shell BP Shunter.jpg

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Nonneminstre Models produce a nice little Whitemetal kit for a Planet diesel that runs on a Spud or Black Beetle power bogie.

 

http://www.nonneminstre.co.uk/resources/Nonneminstre%20Models%202012%20Price%20List.pdf

 

The Bachmann 14T tank wagon is pretty close in general design to the Irish Shell wagons http://www.ehattons.com/trade/StockDetail.aspx?SID=18010

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The Bachmann 14T tank wagon is pretty close in general design to the Irish Shell wagons http://www.ehattons.com/trade/StockDetail.aspx?SID=18010

 

What colour schemes did they carry?

Was it silver tank, red frames with 'IRISH SHELL' or 'MEX' in red or were there variations on this?

Edited by minister_for_hardship
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Nonneminstre Models produce a nice little Whitemetal kit for a Planet diesel that runs on a Spud or Black Beetle power bogie.

 

http://www.nonneminstre.co.uk/resources/Nonneminstre%20Models%202012%20Price%20List.pdf

 

Nice one, John. I'd forgotten about Nonneminstre Models. They also produce a Hunslet War Department diesel loco, similar to the ones on display at Cultra and Dromod, and a Fowler diesel like the one at Dromod, except the model version is 2ft gauge instead of 3ft.

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The Irish Shell loco was (and is) plain unlined mid green with certain bits picked out in red. If memory serves me correctly, Shell petrol tankers had a livery of red and green in the late 50s / early 60s.

 

It's currently out of action, but served faithfully as the Whitehead shutter for years. I believe its build date was 1951.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A few photos (not the best quality )of the older type of tank wagons around the Point Yard and Tuam.

 

Irish Shell & BP.jpg

 

Irish Shell & BP Wagon East Wall Yard Mid 1990s. Charles Roberts wagon dating from late 1920s.

Silver/light grey body red solebars Type A tank wagon.

 

ESSO & MEX.jpg

 

ESSO & MEX 202 Point Yard Mid 1980s.

 

The MEX tanker is for Class A highly flammable traffic Petrol and has two compartments.

Silver tank with horizontal orange stripe along centre of barrel.

 

The ESSO tank wagon appears to be a fairly modern bitumen tanker the give away is the insulated body with coned ends.

 

MEX.jpg

 

MEX tank wagon Tuam sister to 212 but more modern wagon possibly dating from the 1930s no tie down cables around the dome.

 

Caltex.jpg

 

The Joker in the pack TEXACO/CALTEX modern 1960s wagon with anchor mounted tank Light grey tank with red solebars and TEXACO lettering. A modelling challenge with the older CALTEX lettering and horizontal orange stripe grinning through.

 

The TEXACO wagons were commandeered by CIE in the late 70s & 80s and were used on the Alexandra Road Inchacore fuel oil trains.

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The tank wagons used by the oil companies were nearly all private owner and separate from railway company stock. The man exception appears to have been the 6 tank wagons built for Burmah in the early 70s.

 

The Donegal & Swilly each had tank wagons with the railway company owning the underframe & the oil company the barrel.

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  • 10 months later...

Great job, Popeye! and thanks for even including the donors! What period are these modeled from? The Irish Shells earlier in the thread looked black (in a B&W photo, granted) like your Esso. Is your black Esso from that steam period and the silvers are a later livery albeit the same earlier period tanker with the steel tie-down cables over the top?

Are they transfers your own creation or available to purchase?

Thanks for posting. Kevin

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Very tasty job on the tank wagons Patrick. The Bachmann model really lifted the standard for rtr tank wagons and a good candidate for limited run production for Irish Shell, Mc Mullen Brothers, Mex.

 

The silver tank barrel with horizontal red stripe or red solebars was an early form of hazmat marking applied to distinguish Type A tank wagons used carry petrol and other highly flammable liquids from the usually black Type B tank wagons used to carry heavy fuel oil and other flammable liquids.

 

The position of the red strip tended to vary between the centre of the barrel and solebars, silver gave way to light grey in the 60s. The type A & B tank wagons had different discharge arrangements petrol was basically siphoned out of a Type A tank wagon with U tube arrangement on top of the barrel, heavy fuel oil though a valve under a Type B tank wagon.

 

The Type A tank wagons tended to look cleaner than the Type B without the usual build up of grunge around the tank filler usually seen on wagons used to transport heavy fuel oil and bitumen

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New Irish Lines Vol 2. No 6 2001 http://newirishlines.org/archive-2/ includes an article by Chris Aspinwall & Alan O'Rourke on Irish private owner tank wagons the article includes photos and details of both Dublin & Belfast registered tank wagons but breaks off before the introduction of more modern wagons by Caltex and ESSO in the 1960s.

 

Thanks, John:tumbsup:

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  • 2 weeks later...

The ESSO Teo tank wagons appear to have been imported from the UK in the late 60s most were Class B which had a longer tank barrel than the Dapol model though a few Type B appear to have been imported.

 

The fillet between the tank and chassis was a feature of most CIE tank wagons built/introduced in the 1970s, eventually applied to the ESSO tank cars.

 

Its fairly simple to convert the Dapol kit to a Type A by splicing sections from another kit on to each end of the barrel and sanding smooth.

 

DSCF3536.jpg

 

DSCF5653.jpg

 

Its probably better to look out for un-built Airfix kits of these wagons on e-bay than attempt to build the current Dapol version. Its difficult to build a chassis that runs well as the solebars of the Dapol version tend to warp and twist, combination of being wrapped in a bag and the soapy nature of the plastic.

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