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Irish Railway Trivia

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Glenderg
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Just for the craic to keep the heads scratching for a while. I'll get the ball rolling, and feel free to add more, even if previous haven't been answered.

 

01: Name a location in mainland europe, outside of this Island that uses 5'3" gauge railway tracks.

 

I know it was used at one stage in some part of Germany but not anymore? :confused:

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So

Will a coconut lubricate a flange?

No, because coconuts were traditionally never used in the lubrication side of railway maintenance, nor any facet of the railway. Even if they were, they'd have been particularly hard to procure, especially on SLNCR & smaller more western railways where cocunuts were not commonplace. Second, and more importantly your question is not trivia related. I'd suggest trying again tomorrow dave when you've reset yourself.

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An easy one....

 

"At limerick junction the lowly, but now legendary Mr xxx who was in charge of the points leading from the W & LR main line into the station, and whose memory is perpetuared to this day by XXX, although many of higher rank are forgotten, came monetarily into the news. In october he boldly asked for 1 cwt of coal per week - no doubt to keep his isolated points box or cottage warm - but his request was refused."

 

From 1865....

 

Who was the legendary individual, what was his first name, and why was he so legendary?

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So

Will a coconut lubricate a flange?

 

Well put simply No , having consulted various railway books , techicnal and otherwise , coconut oil harvested from coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) can be used as engine oil in come cases as a bio fuel in tropical countries, correct flange lubraction would require grease

as opposed to oil, anyway our climate is sadly lacking in palm trees , there was one beside the railway at Howth a number of years ago but I never saw any coconuts hanging from it

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Well put simply No , having consulted various railway books , techicnal and otherwise , coconut oil harvested from coconut palm (Cocos nucifera) can be used as engine oil in come cases as a bio fuel in tropical countries, correct flange lubraction would require grease

as opposed to oil, anyway our climate is sadly lacking in palm trees , there was one beside the railway at Howth a number of years ago but I never saw any coconuts hanging from it

 

Fear not - help is at hand..

 

hand-cleaning-paste-25365-3313559.jpg

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An easy one....

 

"At limerick junction the lowly, but now legendary Mr xxx who was in charge of the points leading from the W & LR main line into the station, and whose memory is perpetuared to this day by XXX, although many of higher rank are forgotten, came monetarily into the news. In october he boldly asked for 1 cwt of coal per week - no doubt to keep his isolated points box or cottage warm - but his request was refused."

 

From 1865....

 

Who was the legendary individual, what was his first name, and why was he so legendary?

 

i give up! who ?

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Yes indeed the legendary figure was mr william keane, legendary apparently, for owning the little cottage that sat tween the various overlapping lines, and controlling the points for many routes, and essentially allowing trains to pass when it suited him, and holding up trains who's drivers he didn't like. Not even Acts of Parliment could shift him!

 

The boat was called the dream and it was strapped to the carraige immediately behind the steam tender for the inagural boat race between ucc and trinity, like the oxbridge race in the uk. Somewhere outside mallow, the sparks from the chimney set it on fire and by the time it got to the junction there was mayhem. The race was called off and never held since!

 

r

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Yes indeed the legendary figure was mr william keane, legendary apparently, for owning the little cottage that sat tween the various overlapping lines, and controlling the points for many routes, and essentially allowing trains to pass when it suited him, and holding up trains who's drivers he didn't like. Not even Acts of Parliment could shift him!

 

Hmmm, sounds like union relations in the 70's, plus ca change etc......

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1. A railway junction in Ireland that was officially named in honour of a woman?

 

2. Name Ireland's only private (1:1, not fun size!) steam loco builder, and is known to have built one for export?

 

3. What does a 'spoiled basket' refer to?

 

4. What locos, other than the 800's and ex GNR locos, carried names in CIE days?

 

5. Also can you think of any stations in Ireland that have changed names more than once?

Edited by minister_for_hardship
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Ballybrack, called after Granny Brack

Bush , Co Louth on the old Dundalk Greenore line

Clonsilla, after "Our Cilla"

Connolly, after Mrs Connolly who gave out the jam sandwiches in St John Bosco's in the 60's

 

 

PADDY MURPHY

 

A basket contains 5 apples, of which 1 is spoiled and the rest are good. If The Minister for Hardship is to select 2 apples from the basket simultaneously and at random, what is the possibility that the 2 apples selected will include the spoiled apple? That kind of thing?

 

 

 

They all did, "The 9.15 to Sligo" "The 10.12 to Howth" etc

 

No

Edited by WRENNEIRE
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