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SURVEY - Irish Railway Modelling - RESULTS

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Noel
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Hi Folks. Results below of the mini survey which was presented for fun and information. Thanks to all who took the time to respond. There were 150 responses. As stated it was a simple mini survey limited to only 10 questions hence some areas omitted due to space limitations. Perhaps in the future a more comprehensive survey covering a greater aspects of the hobby could be taken. Good night all. Noel

 


Q1. What aspect of the hobby do you most enjoy?

 

q1.png

 


Q2. Which RTR Manufacturers products do you currently own?

 

q2.png

 


Q3. Please tick all eras that you like to model

 

q3.png

 

 

Q4. Your modeling interests

 

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Q5. Rate importance of model loco features

 

q5a.png

q5b.png

 


Q6. How many of these model locos would you purchase in the next 5 years if they were available from MM/Bachmann?

 

q6.png

 


Q7. 121 class livery choices - pick one or more

 

q7.png

 


Q8. A or C class livery choices - pick one or more

 

q8.png

 


Q9. Are you likely to buy any of these existing MM/Bachmann coaching stock in the next 3 years

 

q9.png

 


Q10. Which future RTR models would you buy if quality as good MM/Bachmann? Tick all that apply.

 

q10.png

 


 

END

Edited by Noel
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Superb work Noel.

 

I find it amazing that there is more interest in railcars than per way models, yet the railcars are least likely to shift as an rtr model!

It is interesting though how the laminates have a determined following, nearly on par with the IE/IR twin striped rolling stock. And guess what, 121 an A class are the most desirable - who'd a thunk it.

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Nice job Noel. Be great to see the actual responses filed under the 'other' columns if possible?

 

Hi Fran

You can use this link to view the results and see the 'responses/comments' to 'other' categories in questions 1, 2, and 4 by clicking 'responses' or 'comments' as appropriate: https://www.surveymonkey.net/results/SM-B5VBHKF7

 

Thanks guys for kind comments. It was done for 'fun' and I hope some of it may have been of interest despite the scientifically small sample, and limited scope (i.e. GSR/CIE/IR/IE). However I was surprised it got so many responses in such a short time. Perhaps in the future a more extensive survey could be done, perhaps in conjunction with the next MRSI show to get a really decent sample size (e.g. 1000 responses). My sincere thanks again to all of you who took the few mins to complete this survey.

 

Most of the results were probably as expected, but there were a few small surprises for me. The notable results that stuck out for me were the high percentage who most enjoyed running model trains, the numbers interested in scratch building was higher than I'd expected, and I didn't foresee chassis running quality rating slightly higher than fine scale detail in model loco specs. I was also struck by the level of interest in RTR Laminate coaches and AEC 2600 railcars.

 

One interesting little observation was that older liveries seemed more popular than folks interest in the eras in which they ran. I probably should have had an era listed for each decade rather than 20 year spans.

 

Thanks again folks

 

Noel

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Hi Fran

You can use this link to view the results and see the 'responses/comments' to 'other' categories in questions 1, 2, and 4 by clicking 'responses' or 'comments' as appropriate: https://www.surveymonkey.net/results/SM-B5VBHKF7

 

Thanks guys for kind comments. It was done for 'fun' and I hope some of it may have been of interest despite the scientifically small sample, and limited scope (i.e. GSR/CIE/IR/IE). However I was surprised it got so many responses in such a short time. Perhaps in the future a more extensive survey could be done, perhaps in conjunction with the next MRSI show to get a really decent sample size (e.g. 1000 responses). My sincere thanks again to all of you who took the few mins to complete this survey.

 

Most of the results were probably as expected, but there were a few small surprises for me. The notable results that stuck out for me were the high percentage who most enjoyed running model trains, the numbers interested in scratch building was higher than I'd expected, and I didn't foresee chassis running quality rating slightly higher than fine scale detail in model loco specs. I was also struck by the level of interest in RTR Laminate coaches and AEC 2600 railcars.

 

One interesting little observation was that older liveries seemed more popular than folks interest in the eras in which they ran. I probably should have had an era listed for each decade rather than 20 year spans.

 

Thanks again folks

 

Noel

 

Cheers Noel, will have to have a proper gander.

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Noel

 

All interesting stuff.

 

The choice of steam loco to produce was interesting.

 

I wonder what the answers would have been if you had suggested a "101"Class (J15) 0-6-0?

 

Apart from two preserved ones, they were all over the place "down South" until 1960 or so and were the last to go.

 

Leslie

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Well Noel if nothing else you'll have giving us something to talk about, personnely I noticed in Q4 the number of RTR & Diesel came out very high, I thought Steam would have faired better, giving that we have such a small number to run !

 

Yes that's interesting. My theory is before Murphy Models most of our demographic age group interested in model trains, probably grew up experiencing steam trains from UK TV & films, yet traveled on CIE/IR trains, so pre-MM we played with steam models 'as seen' on TV mini-series from manufacturers such as Hornby and Bachmann. When we were children most toy trains were steam. MM comes along and we could then run familiar CIE/IR trains that we actually travelled on and saw in the flesh! I'd guess most of us started in railway modelling with UK steam outline.

 

One wonders where the hobby might be in 20 years time. Will it be stronger or weaker? LCD screens prevent many youngsters from 'doing stuff' with physical interaction, hence less airfix, lego, mecanno, woodwork, sports, music, playing soldiers, drawing, painting, etc. Loss of outlets for creativity and imagination. I wonder about the next generation of engineers we will have in 20 years time - may never so much as even build an egg-box fort or tunnel, yet may be expert players on X-box consoles! :) Smartphone model train app simulators focused on crashing and disasters!!! Many children do not know how to solder, change a plug (don't need to), fix a leaky car radiator with egg white to get home, use nylons to get a car home if the fan belt goes, but they know where the cars USB port is!!! :)

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One wonders where the hobby might be in 20 years time. Will it be stronger or weaker? LCD screens prevent many youngsters from 'doing stuff' with physical interaction, hence less airfix, lego, mecanno, woodwork, sports, music, playing soldiers, drawing, painting, etc. Loss of outlets for creativity and imagination. I wonder about the next generation of engineers we will have in 20 years time - may never so much as even build an egg-box fort or tunnel, yet may be expert players on X-box consoles! Smartphone model train app simulators focused on crashing and disasters!!! Many children do not know how to solder, change a plug (don't need to), fix a leaky car radiator with egg white to get home, use nylons to get a car home if the fan belt goes, but they know where the cars USB port is!!

 

Noel, I think we can safely seperate the Train Set from Model Railways. Today the train set is probably almost extinct and kids are a small part of the hobby. This can be seen in the expense now involved in building any sort of a collection. This is especially true once you stray away from mainstream Uk stock. SO if you want to collect and model CIE/IR/IE etc, you're into expense that rules out kids.

 

IN that regard , what we now have is a pure-er Model Railway hobby , mainly adult orientated, This is not dissimilar to other forms of Hobby modelling, all of which are more sophisticated, finer detail and more expensive.

 

As Railway Modelling,, the hobby is in rude health.

 

Mind you what future generations of retirees are going to model from their memory, railcars, destroyed infrastructure and no rail movements , I dont know. I suspect this hobby will be locked into the 1970-2000s perpetually.

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Alas what will happen to the hobby in 40 years?As a young adult myself:cool:It seems the method of how to get into the hobby have changed.Unlike a lad in the 50s 60s 70s 80s and even the 90s i dont have the joy of watching engines shunt and run round their trains or get serviced etc. instead i look at the vintage steam locos of britain and ireland as monuments of the good old times.But i think a modeller who would want to model the 20th century now or in the future would have to look around alot more. Videos, books and help from people who know what they are on about.I do not think DMUs passing through a station and nothing else seems a bit dull.

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I do not think DMUs passing through a station and nothing else seems a bit dull.

 

Well the upside will be the model track work will be simple, about two points needed for the whole layout, you can control the single railcar under a simple computer control and have it shuttle back and forth, you wont need much stock, just keep re-arranging the railcars sets !. Freight will consist of .... nothing, permanent way will be a couple of modern JCBS

 

Modelling the stations will consist mostly of open space filled with model weeds, and old ballast, chuck around a few points of old rail and sleepers to model the authentic derelict look. plenty of model grass and weeds , decay ,, and of course a few axle counter mushrooms and 1 ctc signal , that should model waterford anyway

 

personally , for me , it will always be 1980

 

 

dear dear me

Edited by Junctionmad
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Noel, I think we can safely seperate the Train Set from Model Railways. Today the train set is probably almost extinct and kids are a small part of the hobby. This can be seen in the expense now involved in building any sort of a collection. This is especially true once you stray away from mainstream Uk stock. SO if you want to collect and model CIE/IR/IE etc, you're into expense that rules out kids.

 

IN that regard , what we now have is a pure-er Model Railway hobby , mainly adult orientated, This is not dissimilar to other forms of Hobby modelling, all of which are more sophisticated, finer detail and more expensive.

 

As Railway Modelling,, the hobby is in rude health.

 

Mind you what future generations of retirees are going to model from their memory, railcars, destroyed infrastructure and no rail movements , I dont know. I suspect this hobby will be locked into the 1970-2000s perpetually.

 

Sure Dave, but I guess my point was really that most of us probably got 'hooked' back at a time when we were youngsters and toy trains were part of the scene, and nostalgia hooked us in. I wonder how 'new' blood will get attracted into the hobby in the future?

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Alas what will happen to the hobby in 40 years?As a young adult myself:cool:It seems the method of how to get into the hobby have changed.Unlike a lad in the 50s 60s 70s 80s and even the 90s i dont have the joy of watching engines shunt and run round their trains or get serviced etc. instead i look at the vintage steam locos of britain and ireland as monuments of the good old times.But i think a modeller who would want to model the 20th century now or in the future would have to look around alot more. Videos, books and help from people who know what they are on about.I do not think DMUs passing through a station and nothing else seems a bit dull.

 

 

Good post, Agree. Operationally what we witnessed as youngsters on railways was a lot more interesting then todays rail car traffic operating like a boring pendulum swinging mindlessly back and forth.

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Well the upside will be the model track work will be simple, about two points needed for the whole layout, you can control the single railcar under a simple computer control and have it shuttle back and forth, you wont need much stock, just keep re-arranging the railcars sets !. Freight will consist of .... nothing, permanent way will be a couple of modern JCBS

 

Modelling the stations will consist mostly of open space filled with model weeds, and old ballast, chuck around a few points of old rail and sleepers to model the authentic derelict look. plenty of model grass and weeds , decay ,, and of course a few axle counter mushrooms and 1 ctc signal , that should model waterford anyway

personally , for me , it will always be 1980

 

dear dear me

 

Jesus, how depressing is that for future model railway modellers, I'm so glad I lived in the 50's, 60's, 70's,

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how depressing is that for future model railway modellers, I'm so glad I lived in the 50's, 60's, 70's,

 

Ah now its not all doom and gloom. Before MM, many of us were quite happy running models of UK steam outline that ran 50 or more years before many of us were even born! :) Trains we never saw running except in the movies and on TV!!! So we need a few good thriller and drama movies set in Ireland during the 60s, 70s, and 80s with trains as part of the story line. The craggy island express, etc.

Edited by Noel
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The survey seems to indicate a big turn in direction towards the CIE era. However, when the MM 141/181s were first released, the main area of interest seemed to be the IR/IE era judging by the way the locos and coaches sold. In fact, you could still easily pick up CIE liveried 141/181s up to about a year ago. I think now that many models and liveries are available, courtesy of MM, modellers are trying to replicate the era when what many modellers would call 'real' trains operated over the network. Indeed, I also wanted to model the current scene when MM started releasing their models, but have since changed direction to the CIE era.

 

Fair play to Noel for compiling the survey.

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I suspect this hobby will be locked into the 1970-2000s perpetually.

 

Looking through old magazines; before the 70's there was quite a bit of pre-Grouping, then an obsession with Big Four. Into the 90's and the 'death of steam' was, well, quite literally done to death. BR blue and grey etc. Things move on all the time. Maybe someone will look back nostalgically on modern DMU's, who knows?

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The survey seems to indicate a big turn in direction towards the CIE era. However, when the MM 141/181s were first released, the main area of interest seemed to be the IR/IE era judging by the way the locos and coaches sold. In fact, you could still easily pick up CIE liveried 141/181s up to about a year ago. I think now that many models and liveries are available, courtesy of MM, modellers are trying to replicate the era when what many modellers would call 'real' trains operated over the network. Indeed, I also wanted to model the current scene when MM started releasing their models, but have since changed direction to the CIE era.

 

Yes thats interesting, I also found myself leaning more towards black CIE era 141/181s than others. I never travelled behind IR/IE livery 141/181s, only super train and CIE black/tan, yet I ignored the 'supertrain' livery models just because I preferred the look of the later IR/IE tippex liveries - strange but true.

 

The CIE black (&tan with white band) livery 141/181s look great hauling loose coupled goods wagons that I collected to run behind GWR/LMS steam locos before MM era.

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Looking through old magazines; before the 70's there was quite a bit of pre-Grouping, then an obsession with Big Four. Into the 90's and the 'death of steam' was, well, quite literally done to death. BR blue and grey etc. Things move on all the time. Maybe someone will look back nostalgically on modern DMU's, who knows?

 

no I was referring to irish railways. post 2000 , whats there to model , a few DMUs, no freight, no track complexity,

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no I was referring to irish railways. post 2000 , whats there to model , a few DMUs, no freight, no track complexity,

 

Look on the bright side - no complex pointwork to be modelled saving €€€'s & no spending a fortune on loads of wagons to model a freight train! ;-)

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no I was referring to irish railways. post 2000 , whats there to model , a few DMUs, no freight, no track complexity,

 

With no-one making affordable RTR Irish dmus (not repaints); again, who knows how popular (or otherwise) it would be?

 

Can't see the fascination myself with modern dmus insofar as I wouldn't bother to take a pic of them. Every modern day station is uglified with cobble-lock paving, modern additions and wheelchair lifts and every trackside defaced with palisade fencing. But some people seem to like the modern scene. Horses for courses.

Edited by minister_for_hardship
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Well when I was a child the definition of a train was an "engine" pulling "carriages" or "wagons" with a brake van at the end like a full stop completing a sentence. No engine, no train! :) ICRs, DMUs, Darts and Luas are just bland boring bendy buses stuck on rails. :)

 

3022383_dbd122f0.jpg

 

cork_albert_quay_goods_yard_-_geograph-org-uk_-_2230199.jpg

 

K0yu86AS5B3ek.jpg

 

Gathering2.jpg

Edited by Noel
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With no-one making affordable RTR Irish dmus (not repaints); again, who knows how popular (or otherwise) it would be?

 

Can't see the fascination myself with modern dmus insofar as I wouldn't bother to take a pic of them. Every modern day station is uglified with cobble-lock paving, modern additions and wheelchair lifts and every trackside defaced with palisade fencing. But some people seem to like the modern scene. Horses for courses.

 

Amen, once you've seen one ICR you've seen them all. I've taken pics of them just to keep warm while waiting for something interesting to come along. Sadly getting less likely these days. And stations have been vandalized in the name of modernity! I think it's great that there is accessibility for those physically impaired but could the facilities not be designed to fit in with the period buildings a bit better?

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On a practical note, perhaps earlier era stock generally being short lends itself to the space restrictions of model layouts. Long modern coaches such as mk3/mk4/22k and long bogie freight stock take up a lot of space on a layout, need large radius curves and long platforms to look right.

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wouldnt you have too go back to the early 1900s for that

 

Do you mean for shorter rolling stock? I was primarily thinking of the 1960s and early 70s when coaches were only 57-62ft compared to 78ft now and 2 axil un-braked loose coupled goods wagons were 1/3rd the length of a container flat. Goods wagons that size were pretty much the same from 1900 until about 1970. I'd love to have a rake of 12 open sugar beat wagons which were also used for coal and general goods freight (i.e. corrugated side panels).

 

12 of these would be nice at the right price

60192618.jpg

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