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OO works announce GNRI U Class

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Warbonnet
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Wouldn't that be the first real Irish RTR steam loco?

I wouldn't include bachmanns mogul as it is just a direct repaint.

 

Ncc jinty in the early 2000's? , the n class isn t bad either but i know what your saying. So i suppose yes would be the answer as these will be the first proper rtr irish steam loco run that weren t based on a uk loco.

Edited by Riversuir226
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Gents

 

OO Works:

 

They get slightly mixed reviews, see -

 

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/41670-who-are-oo-works-and-what-do-they-make/

 

but at the price, it must be worth a punt, if you're a GN person, like me!

 

Nelson (who sent me an e-mail)-

 

Thanks for bringing it to my attention.

 

Orders going in!!

 

Leslie

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Can I suggest a tempering of expectations here?

 

- The joints on the boiler appear to be too few

- The dome looks slightly too large

- the rivet detail underneath is missing

- Pipework on the sides is absent

- some roof detail is missing on the cab

- complete absence of rivet detailing on the tender.

- valve doohickey in front of cab centre and associated pipework absent.

 

I'd want a bit more detail before I shelled out €400 on a loco. I assume this a "first run" cad and more is to come?

 

Class U - 203 ARMAGH - GNR(I) 4-4-0 - built 1948 by Beyer Peacock - 1958 to CIE as 203N - withdrawn 1962.

 

Mr. Humbug

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Can I suggest a tempering of expectations here?

 

- The joints on the boiler appear to be too few

- The dome looks slightly too large

- the rivet detail underneath is missing

- Pipework on the sides is absent

- some roof detail is missing on the cab

- complete absence of rivet detailing on the tender.

- valve doohickey in front of cab centre and associated pipework absent.

 

I'd want a bit more detail before I shelled out €400 on a loco. I assume this a "first run" cad and more is to come?

 

Class U - 203 ARMAGH - GNR(I) 4-4-0 - built 1948 by Beyer Peacock - 1958 to CIE as 203N - withdrawn 1962.

 

Mr. Humbug

 

I see what you mean from the CAD image on their web site

 

PS: Please don't flame me folks, but unfortunately again another rather poor web site. In this day and age even the smallest cottage industries can have decent looking websites (i.e. out of the box template sites, end user CMS, etc).

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I agree that a decent website is essential.

 

On that note, I was perusing other model making websites recently, as well as some steam-orientated model engineering ones.

 

Is it me, or do model engineer's have a habit of indulging in apostrophe overload? It seem's that lot's of website's run by person's in this line of business, tend to include apostrophe's in all plural word's that the'y write....

 

Its mad.....

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Wow

they are working out at around £350 per with another €13.5 p&please

Expensive yokes

 

Agreed, but £350 sounds so much less than €500. Ouch.

 

That's a Unit right there. (buddy of mine when getting his house built found EVERYTHING cost at least €500, hence "t'was three units....t'was just a unit etc.")

 

 

You ok with the punctuation there JB? :)

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?..Is it me, or do model engineer's have a habit of indulging in apostrophe overload? It seem's that lot's of website's run by person's in this line of business, tend to include apostrophe's in all plural word's that the'y write....

 

Its mad.....

 

They used to be greengrocer's, selling tomatoe's and potatoe's....

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I agree that a decent website is essential.

 

On that note, I was perusing other model making websites recently, as well as some steam-orientated model engineering ones.

 

Is it me, or do model engineer's have a habit of indulging in apostrophe overload? It seem's that lot's of website's run by person's in this line of business, tend to include apostrophe's in all plural word's that the'y write....

 

Its mad.....

 

Not mad at all jb I

Honours English in '72 would not have been the same without them

2.5% of total marks in your essay for proper use of

Full stops however are another days work

Your the'y in your second last sentence would have cost you that 2.5%

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A can of Worms!

 

More Punctuation Rules: Spacing With Punctuation Periods Commas Semicolons Colons Question Marks Parentheses and Brackets Apostrophes Hyphens Dashes Ellipses Quotation Marks Exclamation Points Slashes

 

 

 

Rule 1a. Use the apostrophe to show possession. To show possession with a singular noun, add an apostrophe plus the letter s.

 

Examples:

a woman's hat

the boss's wife

Mrs. Chang's house

 

 

Rule 1b. Many common nouns end in the letter s (lens, cactus, bus, etc.). So do a lot of proper nouns (Mr. Jones, Texas, Christmas). There are conflicting policies and theories about how to show possession when writing such nouns. There is no right answer; the best advice is to choose a formula and stay consistent.

 

 

Rule 1c. Some writers and editors add only an apostrophe to all nouns ending in s. And some add an apostrophe + s to every proper noun, be it Hastings's or Jones's.

 

One method, common in newspapers and magazines, is to add an apostrophe + s ('s) to common nouns ending in s, but only a stand-alone apostrophe to proper nouns ending in s.

 

Examples:

the class's hours

Mr. Jones' golf clubs

the canvas's size

Texas' weather

 

Care must be taken to place the apostrophe outside the word in question. For instance, if talking about a pen belonging to Mr. Hastings, many people would wrongly write Mr. Hasting's pen (his name is not Mr. Hasting).

 

Correct: Mr. Hastings' pen

 

Another widely used technique is to write the word as we would speak it. For example, since most people saying "Mr. Hastings' pen" would not pronounce an added s, we would write Mr. Hastings' pen with no added s. But most people would pronounce an added s in "Jones's," so we'd write it as we say it: Mr. Jones's golf clubs. This method explains the punctuation of for goodness' sake.

 

 

Rule 2a. Regular nouns are nouns that form their plurals by adding either the letter s or -es (guy, guys; letter, letters; actress, actresses; etc.). To show plural possession, simply put an apostrophe after the s.

 

Correct: guys' night out (guy + s + apostrophe)

Incorrect: guy's night out (implies only one guy)

 

Correct: two actresses' roles (actress + es + apostrophe)

Incorrect: two actress's roles

 

 

Rule 2b. Do not use an apostrophe + s to make a regular noun plural.

 

Incorrect: Apostrophe's are confusing.

Correct: Apostrophes are confusing.

 

Incorrect: We've had many happy Christmas's.

Correct: We've had many happy Christmases.

 

In special cases, such as when forming a plural of a word that is not normally a noun, some writers add an apostrophe for clarity.

 

Example: Here are some do's and don'ts.

 

In that sentence, the verb do is used as a plural noun, and the apostrophe was added because the writer felt that dos was confusing. Not all writers agree; some see no problem with dos and don'ts.

 

However, with single lowercase letters, it is advisable to use apostrophes.

 

Example: My a's look like u's.

 

Imagine the confusion if you wrote that sentence without apostrophes. Readers would see as and us, and feel lost.

 

 

Rule 2c. English also has many irregular nouns (child, nucleus, tooth, etc.). These nouns become plural by changing their spelling, sometimes becoming quite different words. You may find it helpful to write out the entire irregular plural noun before adding an apostrophe or an apostrophe + s.

 

Incorrect: two childrens' hats

The plural is children, not childrens.

Correct: two children's hats (children + apostrophe + s)

 

Incorrect: the teeths' roots

Correct: the teeth's roots

 

 

Rule 2d. Things can get really confusing with the possessive plurals of proper names ending in s, such as Hastings and Jones.

 

If you're the guest of the Ford family—the Fords—you're the Fords' guest (Ford + s + apostrophe). But what if it's the Hastings family?

 

Most would call them the "Hastings." But that would refer to a family named "Hasting." If someone's name ends in s, we must add -es for the plural. The plural of Hastings is Hastingses. The members of the Jones family are the Joneses.

 

To show possession, add an apostrophe.

 

Incorrect: the Hastings' dog

Correct: the Hastingses' dog (Hastings + es + apostrophe)

 

Incorrect: the Jones' car

Correct: the Joneses' car

 

In serious writing, this rule must be followed no matter how strange or awkward the results.

 

 

Rule 2e. Never use an apostrophe to make a name plural.

 

Incorrect: The Wilson's are here.

Correct: The Wilsons are here.

 

Incorrect: We visited the Sanchez's.

Correct: We visited the Sanchezes.

 

 

Rule 3. With a singular compound noun (for example, mother-in-law), show possession with an apostrophe + s at the end of the word.

 

Example: my mother-in-law's hat

 

If the compound noun (e.g., brother-in-law) is to be made plural, form the plural first (brothers-in-law), and then use the apostrophe + s.

 

Example: my two brothers-in-law's hats

 

 

Rule 4. If two people possess the same item, put the apostrophe + s after the second name only.

 

Example: Cesar and Maribel's home is constructed of redwood.

 

However, if one of the joint owners is written as a pronoun, use the possessive form for both.

 

Incorrect: Maribel and my home

Correct: Maribel's and my home

 

Incorrect: he and Maribel's home

Incorrect: him and Maribel's home

Correct: his and Maribel's home

 

In cases of separate rather than joint possession, use the possessive form for both.

 

Examples:

Cesar's and Maribel's homes are both lovely.

They don't own the homes jointly.

 

Cesar and Maribel's homes are both lovely.

The homes belong to both of them.

 

 

Rule 5. Use an apostrophe with contractions. The apostrophe is placed where a letter or letters have been removed.

 

Examples: doesn't, it's, 'tis, can't, you'd, should've, rock 'n' roll, etc.

Incorrect: does'nt

 

 

Rule 6. There are various approaches to plurals for abbreviations, single letters, and numerals.

 

Many writers and editors prefer an apostrophe after single capitalized letters.

 

Example: I made straight A's.

 

With groups of two or more capital letters, apostrophes seem less necessary.

 

Examples:

There are two new MPs on the base.

He learned his ABCs.

She consulted with three M.D.s. OR She consulted with three M.D.'s.

Some write M.D.'s to give the s separation from the second period.

 

Single-digit numbers are usually spelled out, but when they aren't, you are just as likely to see 2s and 3s as 2's and 3's. With double digits and above, many (but not everyone) regard the apostrophe as superfluous: I scored in the high 90s.

 

There are different schools of thought about years and decades. The following examples are all in widespread use:

 

Examples:

the 1990s

the 1990's

the '90s

the 90's

 

Awkward: the '90's

 

 

Rule 7. Amounts of time or money are sometimes used as possessive adjectives that require apostrophes.

 

Incorrect: three days leave

Correct: three days' leave

 

Incorrect: my two cents worth

Correct: my two cents' worth

 

 

Rule 8. The personal pronouns hers, ours, yours, theirs, its, whose, and the pronoun oneself never take an apostrophe.

 

Examples:

Correct: Feed a horse grain. It's better for its health.

 

Incorrect: Who's glasses are these?

Correct: Whose glasses are these?

 

Incorrect: Talking to one's self in public is odd.

Correct: Talking to oneself in public is odd.

 

 

Rule 9. When an apostrophe comes before a word or number, take care that it's truly an apostrophe (’) rather than a single quotation mark (‘).

 

Incorrect: ‘Twas the night before Christmas.

Correct: ’Twas the night before Christmas.

 

Incorrect: I voted in ‘08.

Correct: I voted in ’08.

 

 

NOTE

 

Serious writers avoid the word 'til as an alternative to until. The correct word is till, which is many centuries older than until.

 

 

Rule 10. Beware of false possessives, which often occur with nouns ending in s. Don't add apostrophes to noun-derived adjectives ending in s. Close analysis is the best guide.

 

Incorrect: We enjoyed the New Orleans' cuisine.

 

In the preceding sentence, the word the makes no sense unless New Orleans is being used as an adjective to describe cuisine. In English, nouns frequently become adjectives. Adjectives rarely if ever take apostrophes.

 

Incorrect: I like that Beatles' song.

Correct: I like that Beatles song.

 

Again, Beatles is an adjective, modifying song.

 

Incorrect: He's a United States' citizen.

Correct: He's a United States citizen.

 

 

Rule 11. Beware of nouns ending in y; do not show possession by changing the y to ies.

 

Correct: the company's policy

Incorrect: the companies policy

 

To show possession when a noun ending in y becomes plural, write ies'. Do not write y's.

 

Correct: three companies' policies

Incorrect: three company's policies

 

Exception: Names and other proper nouns ending in y become plural simply by adding an s. They do not form their plurals with an apostrophe, or by changing the y to ies.

 

Correct: The Flannerys are coming over.

Incorrect: The Flannery's are coming over.

Incorrect: The Flanneries are coming over.

 

Correct: The Flannerys' house was robbed.

Incorrect: The Flanneries' house was robbed.

 

Site address:-

 

http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/apostro.asp

Edited by Old Blarney
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Can I suggest a tempering of expectations here?

 

- The joints on the boiler appear to be too few

- The dome looks slightly too large

- the rivet detail underneath is missing

- Pipework on the sides is absent

- some roof detail is missing on the cab

- complete absence of rivet detailing on the tender.

- valve doohickey in front of cab centre and associated pipework absent.

 

I'd want a bit more detail before I shelled out €400 on a loco. I assume this a "first run" cad and more is to come?

 

Class U - 203 ARMAGH - GNR(I) 4-4-0 - built 1948 by Beyer Peacock - 1958 to CIE as 203N - withdrawn 1962.

 

Mr. Humbug

 

This is exactly why we should be grateful that someone with attention to detail, like Mr. Humbug, is undertaking the CAD work on the ballast hoppers! :tumbsup:

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But it was a real Irish steam loco nevertheless.

 

Great news and due by the summer?

 

Not really, as when they looked like that they would have been in the grey livery. In the green livery and black livery(which they were modelled in) they would have been "inchicorised" with new riveted smoke boxes and new smoke box doors, along with various other modifications.

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